Archives for posts with tag: conservation

Cliffe Castle Park in Keighley is being restored with funds from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Work started on site in June and I’m following progress and sketching whenever I can.

Treasure means different things to different people. To me, anything that’s been buried and then rediscovered years later has a story to tell, and trying to unlock its history and understand what it is and how it got there makes it fascinating and uniquely valuable.

Intriguing old corroded metal objects dug up during the site clearance

These objects were discovered by metal detector while the top terrace was being cleared, before the diggers started work on the deep trenches for land drains and the foundations for the new buildings. As soon as I heard about their discovery I was dying to have a look and to draw them and I wasn’t disappointed – rusty, corroded, broken, and when I saw them, still encrusted with dirt – they all have a story. And if their full meaning is impossible to make out that only makes them more intriguing. It’s tempting to think of cleaning them up, but at the same time their present state is what they now are, and as the manager of the museum Daru Rooke puts it, ‘their mystery is tied up in their corroded uncertainty.’

Some of them are not in fact all that old (there’s a 2p piece there somewhere) but others are obviously from earlier times. Looking closely I could identify nails (some I thought possibly horseshoe nails) and a squashed thing that looked as if it might be silver – perhaps the tip of a cane? Others looked as though they were brass, but I couldn’t work out what they might be. 

Since my sketch they’ve been thoroughly examined by the museum staff and the collection includes ’19th century nails and brads; a disputed umbrella ferrule/ crushed cartridge case and some non specific fixings.’ So the squashed thing could be a cartridge case. I hadn’t thought of that. (I think I prefer umbrella ferrule…) And a brad, for those – like me – who are not familiar with the technical specifications of nails, according to the dictionary definition is: ‘1 : a thin nail of the same thickness throughout but tapering in width and having a slight projection at the top of one side instead of a head. 2 : a slender wire nail with a small barrel-shaped head.’

Very strange rocks dug up from the site of the old pond

Unlike metal, limestone doesn’t corrode. Bury it, and it won’t be very much changed when it’s dug up again, and these extraordinary rocks were unearthed  when the pond site was excavated. They weren’t entirely unexpected as they appear in old photographs, firstly making a craggy sort of edging around the original pond, and later forming the structure of a rockery when the pond was filled in. But perhaps no-one expected them to be quite so wild and strange, the way eroded limestone can be. They’ve now been removed from the site to be stored, ready in due course to be reassembled around the pond and this should be interesting. Another milestone to look forward to!

More updates on the work of the conservation project, photos, plans, and background information at: https://m.facebook.com/Cliffe-Castle-Heritage-Lottery-Bid-304048249751094, at the Cliffe Castle Park Conservation Group website and on the Parks Service page of Bradford Leisure Services.

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Cliffe Castle Park in Keighley is being restored with funds from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Work started on site in June and I’m following progress and sketching whenever I can.

The pond taking on its finished shape – still with some way to go. Click on the picture to view a larger image.

One of the advantages of sketching is that you can ignore things that get in the way and just pretend they’re not there. In this case, the metal security fencing that surrounds the site of the pond – it’s nice to be able to imagine what it’ll be like without it. I didn’t want to leave everything out though – the red water tank on wheels was a nice focal point and a lovely colour in the afternoon sun. 

The finished shape is looking good. When it’s completed I’m told the depth will be about half a metre; the edges will be fringed with rocks and whole site will be landscaped and planted. 

In the meantime I managed to catch a bit more of the work before the edges were completed; the hardcore needed more tamping down and shaping before the concrete went in:

….and this machine, which trundles slowly along doing a job more delicate than that done by the remote controlled trench roller – this, they call the Whacker Plate. Which is exactly what it does!

More updates on the work of the conservation project, photos, plans, and background information at: https://m.facebook.com/Cliffe-Castle-Heritage-Lottery-Bid-304048249751094, at the Cliffe Castle Park Conservation Group website and on the Parks Service page of Bradford Leisure Services.

There’s a lot of groundwork going on right now behind the ten foot high security hoarding, and all that can be seen is the tops of the diggers that occasionally raise their heads above the level of the fence. But now, today, something else is visible from the lawn below the top terrace – the tip of a huge mound of topsoil that’s been gradually getting bigger and bigger as the top layers of earth are removed from various parts of the site and carefully carried to one side. The diggers deposit earth onto the heap and then tamp it down to give it a smooth surface so the rain runs off and doesn’t sink in and turn it into a mountain of mud. And lately we’ve had plenty of rain.
I crept alongside the wire security fence and into the bushes next to the tower to get a better view, and from there I could see the whole magnificent heap. The entire site is covered to a double spade depth with this dark, rich, beautiful soil, the work of generations of Victorian gardeners enriching and fertilising the kitchen gardens that occupied the terrace. Daru Rooke the Museums Manager is calling it ‘Butterfield Topsoil’.

I’m not the only interested observer to hang around the perimeter of the building site. Despite all the noise and disruption (during the last few days they’ve been digging drains, and hitting rock) I’ve watched a young rabbit that seems to be quite unperturbed by all the commotion and looks as if it’s actually interested in what’s going on. I first saw it last week when I was sketching the old toilet block, when I noticed it feeding in the grass above the playground and then hopping nonchalently about near the old building. It didn’t seem to mind me, and didn’t even worry much when a dog-walker went by with her dog on a lead; it just flattened itself in the grass for a moment or two.

This afternoon it was sunbathing in a patch of sun on the tarmac of the footpath just inside the security fence, only yards from where I could hear major earth moving going on. Is this sort of thing interesting to a rabbit? I felt reassured that it seemed so relaxed and comfortable, and enjoyed its company.

Cliffe Castle Park in Keighley is being restored with funds from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Work started on site in June and I’m following progress and sketching whenever I can.

More updates on the work, photos, plans, and background information at: https://m.facebook.com/Cliffe-Castle-Heritage-Lottery-Bid-304048249751094 and at the Cliffe Castle Park Conservation Group website.